Revisiting (and revising) threat

I need to correct some previous math. I was doing some reading and discovered some sites telling me that threat from healing spread differently.

Specifically, I said that the threat you generated would go to each mob — thus if you did 1000 points of healing and you had two mobs, each would pick up 500 threat.

The information I read said the threat (500 points) would be distributed between the mobs, meaning each would pick up 250 threat. That’s significantly different, doncha know. So…. off to test.

I went with a friendly paladin (also level 70) to Scarlet Monastery. She stripped armor so she’d take a little damage and made a body pull. She hit each once, and tapped a second a bit more so we’d have a spread of damage, and killed the rest. She then allowed the mobs to hit on her for a while so she’d have damage — roughly double the damage of the second mob. At that point she armored up, and it was my turn to play.

I cast renew, and we watched the tics. If my model was right, I’d be pulling when my heal of the pally doubled the damage of the first mob. If the other model was right, I wouldn’t pull the less-hit mob off till I reached four times the damage. Well, 2 or 4 times as modifed by the 110% ‘more dangerous’ rule. Still, it’d be pretty obvious. By the time I’d fully healed my friendly paladin I’d either pull one (barely) or I’d pull both (one fairly early).

Removing the excruciating details of numbers, the other guys are right.

Your threat from healing is: (Healing/2) / number of mobs in battle . And your threat needs to exceed 110% in melee or 130% at range to pull a mob into your face.

What this means is that the mob under crowd control will still have a bunch of threat oriented your way when the cc breaks, but the amount isn’t near as much, which makes it a lot easier for a tank to get them out of your face.

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~ by Kirk on July 30, 2007.

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